And we’re off…SFmototype has begun!

What did you do last Saturday?  We kicked off the first of it’s kind, 3D Design and Prototyping challenge for motorcyclists, enthusiasts and pretty much anyone who can sketch their motorcycle ideas on paper.

typea-buildtak

BuildTak–a 3D printer build platform manufacturer and SFmototype Sponsor–made these beautiful custom 3D printing surfaces for our Type A Machines Series 1 Pros and Printrbot Simple Metals that are on display at SF Moto (275 8th Street, San Francisco, 10a-6pm)

Last Saturday, September 10th, we had the official kickoff of our first ever SFmototype Design and Prototyping challenge–where for 45 days, err, 40 days now–people have the opportunity to sketch out on paper, napkin, envelope, whatever…a concept related to motorcycles and submit it to our SFmototype competition.  If their concept considered to be the best by a panel of expert judges, they can win a number of prizes:

  1. A motorcycle
  2. 3D printers
  3. CAD training
  4. Shop Training
  5. and much much more…

We had an amazing set of panelists on Saturday.  In the morning session, we explored the “Past, Present and Future of 3D Printing” with several experts.

morning-panel

From left to right: Sachlene Singh from Autodesk, Prof. Ron Rael from U.C. Berkeley and Prinrbot Founder and CEO Brook Drumm.  The panel was moderated by Chris McCoy–the co-founder and CEO of You3Dit.  Learn more about our morning panelists at SFmototype.com.

In the afternoon session, “Motorcycles meet 3D Printing”,  we talked about how 3D printing is impacting the motorcycle industry:

afternoon-panel

From Left to Right: Nathan Jauvitis (off camera), Founder, Chief Scientist, Bolt Motorbikes, Shan Shabsigh, Technical Solutionist, Breathe-3DP, Andrew Rutter, Co-founder and CTO, Type A Machines, Cole Mischler, Designer at Zero Electric Motorcycles and Brook Drumm, Founder and CEO of Printrbot Industries.   This panel was moderated by 3D printing enthusiast and Director of Operations for SF Moto–Thomas Campbell.  Learn more about our afternoon panelists at SFmototype.com.  See below for full 1:20 panel discussion.

Bummed you missed out?  Don’t be…we’re going to have tons of other events planned in the next couple of weeks…so be sure to follow us and SFmototype on Instagram / Twitter / Facebook.  Have questions?  Want to find out more?  Drop us a line: support@you3dit.com

Morning Session “The Past, Present and Future of 3D Printing”:

 

Afternoon Session “Motorcycles meet 3D Printing”:

 

Many many thanks to our Sponsors:

Sponsors Level
 fusion-360-small11 Autodesk – Fusion360

Platinum

 lander_typea Type A Machines

Gold

 techshop TechShop SF

Silver

 printrbot Printrbot

Silver

 kawasaki3greenlines-centered Kawasaki USA

Silver

 breathe-3dpblack Breathe-3DP

Silver

 buildtak_color-logo Buildtak

Silver

 cubicity-logo-rect Cubicity

Silver

 esun-logo Esun

Silver

 hrs-original Hawkridge Systems (Solidworks)

Silver

 parts2bunlimited2blogo Parts Unlimited

Bronze

 akari_logo Akari

Bronze

 logo-ucberkeley UC Berkeley

Bronze

 zero-motorcycles-logo-324x116 Zero

Bronze

 image0016 Bolt Motorbikes

Bronze

SFmototype – an all-new retail experience for motorcycle enthusiasts

It all started back in June 2016 with a “hey, what if we did this…”

Now, we’re giving away motorcycles, 3D printers, CAD software licenses and more to those who enter to win and participate in what we’re calling “SF Mototype”.

Why?  Because we believe everyone has untapped creativity that can be unleashed through Computer Aided Design (CAD) and 3D printing.

sfmototypelogo

On September 10th, we’ll kickoff this all-new retail experience where for 45 days, anyone can become their own motorcycle part / component creator.  Yes…anyone.

At the end of these 45 days, panels of experts will evaluate each submission and prizes* will be awarded to concepts, designs and fabrications which really engender the spirit of this event: anyone should be able to create and build their own motorcycle parts and components…a.k.a. mototypes.

You3Dit and SF Moto have teamed up with a number of industry collaborators to enable people to Make Anything, Anywhere (see partners / sponsors below).

HERE’S HOW THE PROCESS WORKS:

1. You have an idea for a motorcycle part / component / adapter / etc.  Sketch it out on paper, describe it and then, snap a photo and upload to Twitter or Instagram and tag #SFMototype.  Share, retweet, etc. to get folks jazzed up about your motorcycle concept.

2. You will be then be contacted by us–You3Dit.com–via social media…who will turn your sketch into a 3D design file using our network of designers and fabricators.  (See animations and videos of process below.  *Design & fabrication fees may apply).

3. Come to SF Moto in San Francisco to watch 3D printers in action and pick up your print!  Not in the SF area?  No problem…we can help find a 3D printer local to you (shipping costs may apply).

Join us on September 10th at SF Moto to hear all about 3D printing and how it relates to the motorcycle world! Representatives from both worlds will be there to answer questions and talk about this exclusive opportunity!  Our education- and motorcycle- expert panelists will be announced in the coming weeks!

Lunch will be provided for participants as well as special pricing on select motorcycles!

Know someone who might be stoked on this event?  Please please please share this article with them so they have a chance to participate and win!

Want the latest updates?  Follow us and the event:

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/sfmototype (@sfmototype)

Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/sfmototype (@sfmototype)

Many many thanks to our Partners / Sponsors for contributing to this event and helping to make it all possible:

Check out our ad that launches today via City Bike:

sfmototypead

Watch a short animation on how the You3Dit Process all works here:

(still don’t believe it, here’s another short video transforming a sketch into a solid object)

*Contest rules and entry details vary per entrant and per prize.  E-mail support@you3dit.com for details.

3D printing helps fix a design flaw in aftermarket wheels

So as we often explain the myriad possibilities of 3D printers for an uncountable number of potential applications, we reel in our audience’s minds by grounding our expectations with “well, I’m not about ready to 3D print my car axle…but there are tons of applications…” While I didn’t 3D print my axle just quite yet, we did 3D print some rim spacer clips in order to eliminate slop between the brake disc and the rim’s decorative center piece.

Why was this even a problem?  No one looks cool driving a car that has wacky noises coming from the vehicle.  Vehicle sounds are a big part of the driving experience (ask Tesla motors) and while no one should define themselves by the car they drive, no sense in letting it be when the You3Dit network has design and 3D printing resources to easily resolve the issue.

The workflow was pretty simple:

  1. A thin ring that would fit between the wheel hub and the decorative piece
  2. Measure the critical dimensions of the wheel
  3. Transform the sketch into a CAD model (a process called solid modeling)
  4. Export design to STL
  5. Slice and drive 3D printer using Repetier
  6. Test spacer ring on vehicle
  7. Modify dimensions as necessary
  8. Repeat

Once we iterated 2-3x, we had a part that worked. The first two were too thick.  We made the ring into a “U” shape to allow for slop in wheel dimensions, increasing the likelihood that the part would solve the problem.

How the Rim Spacer Ring fits onto the rim and decorative piece.

How the Rim Spacer Ring fits onto the rim and decorative piece.

A screenshot of the Solidworks CAD model we used to print the ring.

A screenshot of the SolidWorks CAD model we used to print the ring.

If you yourself have the same problem with a pesky aftermarket rim, or you’d like to use this file for any other purpose, we’ve uploaded our SolidWorks and STL parts to Thingiverse.com.  The rims featured in this video were purchased from Pepboys are 1097 Proline Wheels.

UPDATE (May 30, 2015): 

So the rims and tires handled just perfectly for the last year with the 3D printed rim spacers as designed…and as expected.  However, it wasn’t until the service guy rotated the tires when they fell out and the wheels were re-assembled without the spacers.  Houston…we have a problem?  Or do we?  Not really, because the wife of the old man who owns the truck has a 3D Printer–A Printrbot Simple Metal!

So with the help of this article (and Thingiverse’s kind gesture of hosting the files), she was able to re-download the STL and 3D print another set.

Rim-spacers to eliminate rattle from wheels.

These were the replacement rim spacers 3D printed by a rather handy grandmother and mother of a 3D printing enthusiast (Chris–the co-founder of You3Dit).

 

So, just when you thought these 3D printing machines were just for younger kids great with computers, think again (note: the woman who did 3D print these is pretty amazing and is pretty darn resourceful for someone of her generation…especially with respect to technology).